The Best and Worst Examples of Classic Rock Bands Trying to Make Disco Songs, Ranked

Numerous classic rock groups tried to enter the disco music trend in the 1970s and early 1980s. In some cases, this search for trends produced classical music. On the other hand, he also produced embarrassing songs.

Kiss Gene Simmons | Jim Dyson/Getty Images

5. ‘Silly Love Songs’ by Wings

Like all of Paul McCartney’s worst works, “Silly Love Songs” manages to be stiff and perky at the same time. You can definitely tell the former Beatle is an outsider trying to emulate disco music rather than someone who really understood the genre.

The lyrics don’t exactly help. This is clearly an attempt by Paul to defend his decision to write a lot of light pop music in the 1970s. Notably, this track became Wings’ biggest hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Eventually, the song vindicated its existence when Baz Luhrmann incorporated it into Red Mill!

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RELATED: The Bee Gees’ first No. 1 disco hit was inspired by a rickety bridge

4. ‘Do you think I’m sexy?’ by Rod Stewart

Technically, Stewart isn’t a band, but he’s a classic rocker nonetheless. Only a psychic could have imagined him doing this song after hearing “Maggie May.” “Do you think I’m sexy?” tries to shoot the stereotypical disco dancer but it’s not funny. Like Paul before him, Stewart didn’t do much grooving.

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3. “Another Bites the Dust” by Queen

“Silly Love Songs” and “Do Ya Think I’m Sexy?” failed because they are so different from regular disco music. “Another One Bites the Dust” succeeds for this reason. The track merges disco, funk and hard rock in a way that makes it stand out from the crowd. Queen also tried to go clubbing again with another single, “Body Language”. While this song is memorably odd, it’s not a five-star classic like “Another One Bites the Dust.”

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RELATED: The Bee Gees’ first No. 1 hit wasn’t a disco song at all

2. “I was made to love you” by Kiss

thanks to the albums Dynasty and Carnival of Souls: The Final Sessions, Kiss is probably the only band to have released both a disco album and a grunge album. Gene Simmons and company deserve more credit for this kind of musical versatility. Plus, they deserve credit for writing one of the best disco songs of all time. With its whispering bass line, “I Was Made for Lovin’ You” remains one of the band’s greatest songs even if it is not characteristic of the band’s sound. Interestingly, “Silly Love Songs” and “I Was Made for Lovin’ You” both fit into a medley in Red Mill!

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1. ‘Miss You’ by the Rolling Stones

Speaking of musical versatility, the Rolling Stones have done it all. Their catalog includes hard rock, soft rock, psychedelic music, country, punk rock, blues, and more. “Miss You” proved they could take on disco with aplomb.

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Listening to the track makes you feel like you’re on your way to a New York club in the 1970s. Maybe you’ll bump into John Travolta while you’re there. Wherever you go, “Miss You” will be worth the trip.

RELATED: Maurice Gibb of the Bee Gees says these ‘dumb’ songs ‘diminish’ his band’s work

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